Both Erdogan and Pope Francis are opposed to U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, which many U.S. allies say could doom Middle East peace efforts.
ERDOGAN AND POPE DISCUSS JERUSALEM
Media Outlet : Reuters
Date of Publication : 05 February 2018
Country : United Kingdom
Writer : Philip Pullella

     Tayyip Erdogan made the first visit by a Turkish president to the Vatican in 59 years on Monday, discussing the status of Jerusalem with Pope Francis, as scuffles broke out between police and demonstrators nearby.

     Returning a visit made by the pope to Turkey in 2014, Erdogan spoke privately with Francis for about 50 minutes in the pontiff's frescoed study in the Vatican's Apostolic Palace, which he uses mostly for ceremonial purposes.

     A Vatican statement said the talks included "the status of Jerusalem, highlighting the need to promote peace and stability in the region (Middle East) through dialogue and negotiation, with respect for human rights and international law."

     Both Erdogan and Pope Francis are opposed to U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, which many U.S. allies say could doom Middle East peace efforts.

     At the end of the private part of the meeting, the pope gave Erdogan a bronze medallion showing an angel embracing the northern and southern hemispheres while overcoming the opposition of a dragon.

     "This is the angel of peace who strangles the demon of war," the pope told Erdogan as he gave him the medallion, made by the Italian artist Guido Verol. "(It is) a symbol of a world based on peace an justice."

     The public part of the meeting, with reporters and Erdogan's entourage, was cordial, although both men seemed stiff at the start while seated at the pope's desk before journalists were ushered out.

     Erdogan's motorcade entered a virtually deserted St. Peter's Square after the streets that are usually bustling with tourists were closed due to security fears.

     Some 3,500 police and security forces were on duty in Rome and authorities declared a no-go area for unauthorised demonstrations that included the Vatican, Erdogan's hotel and Italian palaces where he is meeting the president and prime minister.

     Erdogan and the pope spoke by phone in December after Trump made his announcement on Jerusalem and agreed that any change to the city's status quo should be avoided.

     The Vatican backs a two-state solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, with both sides agreeing on the status of Jerusalem - home to sites holy to the Muslim, Jewish and Christian religions - as part of the peace process.

     Palestinians want East Jerusalem as the capital of a future independent state, whereas Israel has declared the whole city to be its "united and eternal" capital.

     Image Credit: AA/Cumhurbaşkanlığı/Yasin Bülbül

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